Impressionism as the origin of modernism.

Recently we’ve decide to add a collection of classic impressionist images to our collection. While our focus is always on creating and designing original, well crafted modern pieces, many of our customers love these images and our high quality renditions of them makes them a nice decorative choice. From another aspect it’s also nice to have these available as a reference point for the kind of modernism we appreciate. The progression of art in Europe from 1850 through to 1900 sets the stage for Picasso, Braque, Mondrian and others to take the collective human viewpoint on art to a radically new place. We celebrate this work most clearly with Van Gogh’s Iris painting . It’s approach takes a structural and visceral look at these rich beautiful flowers

1178px-Irises-Vincent_van_GoghIrises was painted while Vincent van Gogh was living at the asylum at Saint Paul-de-Mausole in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence, France, in the last year before his death in 1890. It was painted before his first attack at the asylum. There is a lack of the high tension which is seen in his later works. He called the painting “the lightning conductor for my illness” because he felt that he could keep himself from going insane by continuing to paint.

The painting was influenced by Japanese ukiyo-e woodblock prints like many of his works and those by other artists of the time. The similarities occur with strong outlines, unusual angles, including close-up views, and also flattish local colour (not modelled according to the fall of light).

The Getty Museum makes this image available for us to work with and for you to enjoy.

 

 

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